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Poster: deadhead53 Date: Jan 19, 2011 6:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Priceless for all dhead parents

I agree, when they get older I will tackle that topic with them. My 8 yr old understands death, one of her friend's mom just passed away from breast cancer, so that is a little easier to explain to her then drug addiction, but your right it is difficult to try and explain to young ones!

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Jan 19, 2011 6:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Priceless for all dhead parents

And of course the whole relationship between drugs and the Dead becomes particularly dicey with a teen. Especially when you toss in the element of, "Oh, you saw HOW many shows? What were you, some kind of Grateful Dead stalker?" (True quote! And I didn't see anywhere near the number of shows that many folks did. Sounds like a lot to a kid, though ... and given that he's pretty adept at googling ... the discussion can get interesting. Just you wait, LOL!)

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Jan 19, 2011 6:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Priceless for all dhead parents

I think you have to be very upfront and truthful with teens, always treating them as adults. "Yes, I went to lots of shows, yes I experimented with this and that"... with the expectation that they will experiment as well, whether you've told them about it or not, and whether you want them to or not! Guidance and limits... shine some light on their path, but you cannot control absolutely the turns and alleys that path will take. Trust in the skills you've already imparted to them, and remember how it felt to be a teen - how you desired nothing more than to be respected and treated.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Jan 19, 2011 10:22pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Priceless for all dhead parents

Interestingly, the band and its music and history does provide a jumping-off point for increasingly nuanced discussions on that particular issue. And also on stereotyping: just as there are many ways to be Muslim or Christian or left- or right-wing or whatever, there is/was no one thing called a "hippie;" a scuzzy zonked-out waste case flashing the peace sign may be a contemporary stereotype, but it's just not a fair portrait. (OK, not mostly!)